Weddings Around the World: Canada, Eh! October 30 2014

We're back for another round of Weddings Around the World! We're excited to be chatting about our close neighbor to the North, Canada! You may be thinking to yourself--Canadian weddings can't be that different from American weddings. And you would be correct. However, there are a few traditional wedding quirks we just love and wanted to share with you all. Félicitations, Canada!

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On differences in the ceremony: One difference between traditional American weddings and Canadian weddings is that the couple typically signs their marriage license (or registry) during the ceremony. Usually, a table and chairs specifically designed for this purpose will be placed in the church or ceremony venue and the signing is viewed as a sacred portion of the day.
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Maple Leaf Boutineer! Photo by Erin Johnson Photography
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Variations on the Money Dance: Whether you're a fan of it or not, Americans are beginning to incorporate "money dances" into their receptions left and right--a dance during which guests pin cash to the bride's dress. In the French territories of Canada, however, unmarried siblings will sometimes wear funny socks and do a silly dance, prompting money tosses from the crowd. The bride and groom collect the loot afterward.
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A glorious Canadian donut-hole cake. Photo via The Wedding Line
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On the reception: Canadian receptions tend to be lengthier (but just as lavish) as American receptions. It is not unusual for guests to stay into the wee hours of the morning, dancing and eating at a more relaxed event. As cash bars are being slowly considered "taboo" in America, cash bars or drink ticket bars are the absolute norm in Canada.
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On marriage equality: Gay marriage is legal nationwide in Canada. They became the fourth country in the world to pass pro-marriage equality laws in 2005, as a result of the Civil Marriage Act. Many provinces in Canada had previously deemed anti-gay marriage laws unconstitutional pre-2005, including Ontario, British Columbia, Quebec and Nova Scotia. 
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On fun traditions: A sweet tradition in French-Canadian provinces includes a twist on the "first look." Grooms meet the bride and her family at her house, then proceed to make a noisy arrival at the ceremony site in a train of cars. Honking, music and general merriment set the tone for the upcoming event.
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The Trousseau Tea: This traditional tea party is held by the bride’s mother before the wedding and is a chance to celebrate the wedding with neighbors, colleagues and acquaintances that are not invited to the wedding itself. (hitched.ca)
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Tea time! Via Ruffled, Photo by Jamie Delaine